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Tim Allen
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Michael Blackburn
Robert Burton
The Camarade Project
Wayne Clements
Peter Dent
Nikolai Duffy
Stephen Emmerson
Ollie Evans
SJ Fowler
John Goodby
David Greenslade
Colin Herd
Simon Howard
Peter Hughes
Tom Jenks
Joshua Jones
Rupert M Loydell
Gordon Mason
Chris McCabe
James McLaughlin
Lars Palm
Bobby Parker
Mark Russell
Michael Scott
Ian Seed
Rachel Sills
Kathrine Sowerby
Andy Spragg
Martin Stannard
Paul Sutton
Andrew Taylor
Scott Thurston
David Tomaloff
Nathan Thompson
Gareth Twose
Tom Watts
Patrick Williamson
Rodney Wood
Colin Winborn



There are limited numbered copies of each.

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chapbooks - 2011
chapbooks - 2012
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chapbooks - 2014
chapbooks - 2015
chapbooks - 2016
arboreal days ~ daniel bennett
Arboreal Days, Daniel Bennett
January 2018
chapbook [rcp cb49]
A6 52pp 40 copies
£7.00 inc. p&p (UK)
£8.50 inc. p&p (Europe)
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Daniel Bennett

Daniel Bennett was born in Shropshire, and lives and works in London. His poems have appeared in a variety of journals and anthologies, both online and in print. He is also the author of the novel All the Dogs, published by Tindal Street Press in 2008.

Swamp Kiss ~ Colin Herd
Swamp Kiss, Colin Herd
January 2018
chapbook [rcp cb48]A6 46pp 40 copies
£6.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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Colin Herd
Colin Herd is a poet and Lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow. His previous publications include too ok (BlazeVOX, 2011), Glovebox (Knives, Forks and Spoons, 2013), Oberwilding - with SJ Fowler (Austrian Cultural Forum, 2015) and Click & Collect (Boilerhouse Press, 2017). He co-organised Outside-in / Inside-out, A festival of Outside and Subterranean Poetry in Glasgow in 2016. His website is www.colinherd com

“Here’s a reason to celebrate: a fresh batch of poems by Colin Herd. I don’t know anyone else who can make zing the unexpected proximity of danger and corn on the cob, or for that matter castles and bottoms. Swamp Kiss is a delight to read, a lyric bustle of double understandings, jingles, neologisms, jokes, and bathside musings. Tracing ebullient arcs of thought, these poems revel in the language of everyday stuff, sometimes doleful, other times joyous.” -
Lila Matsumoto
Aire ~ Andrew Taylor
Aire, Andrew Taylor
February 2018
chapbook [rcp cb50]A6 46pp 40 copies
£6.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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Andrew Taylor
Andrew Taylor was born in Liverpool in 1967 and lived in Nottingham, where he is Senior Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at Nottingham Trent University.
www.andrewtaylorpoetry.com

"These are some of Taylor’s most evocative poems. Each dwells on a quiet moment, but is part of a concatenation, a narrative of sorts, expressing a joy in being solitary, and noticing.” Rory Waterman

chapbooks - 2017
A Lifes Work ~ Sally Barrett
A Lifes Work, Sally Barrett
April 2018
chapbook [rcp cb51]A6 38pp 40 copies
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Sally Barrett
"The ‘life’s work’ – and the work’s life – is the poems’ unflinching spotlight on deeply personal details, and the candour with which the dark private corners of a life are exposed and illuminated: spilt egg Mornay and the tricky question of virginity mingle with love/death/crying, and Jung’s take on the lot. Like the lingering scent of Vosene Medicated Shampoo, these are poems that will stay with you.” Rachel Sills

Stella Unframed ~ Simon Collings
Stella Unframed, Simon Collings
May 2018
chapbook [rcp cb52]A6 34pp 40 copies
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Simon Collings
"
With the playfully-crafted sonnets of Stella Unframed, Simon Collings offers us a hilarious twenty-first century take on Sir Philip Sidney’s sonnet sequence Astrophel and Stella. The effect is both dizzying and thrilling, as if we were being propelled at ever-increasing speed down a never-ending helterskelter. The views shift, compelling at every turn. Will we ever reach the end? What will happen if we do? “At this point”, as Sonnet XVII declares, “we leave the narrative and enter reality”. We have no choice than to read on." Ian Seed

Distances ~ Ian Seed
Distances, Ian Seed
June 2018
chapbook [rcp cb53]A6 42pp 40 copies
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Distances
The narrators in Distances unearth a series of forgotten, oddly-beautiful stories, which reveal the possibility of a different life.

‘Seed skillfully mirrors the way life works: the chance meetings, the rebuffs, the misunderstandings. All this is done with a real sense of rhythm, of euphony, of music, and of yearning.’ – Ian McMillan, on Identity Papers, in Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine.

Items ~ Martin Stannard
Items, Martin Stannard
August 2018
chapbook [rcp cb54]A6 32pp 40 copies
£6.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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Martin Stannard
“Here is a major book by a major British poet who dances in the ballroom where the avant-garde meets the mainstream and, more importantly, makes us all want to dance there too.”
- Ian McMillan, on Poems for the Young at Heart

…. his laid-back, offbeat style, which combines the mainstream with the avant-garde, is simply so good to read, entertaining, sophisticated and stimulating, sharp but unpretentious at the same time.”
- Steve Spence, Stride, on Poems for the Young at Heart

auto producer ~ Robert Burton
auto producer, Robert Burton
August 2018
chapbook [rcp cb55]A6 48pp 50 copies
£6.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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Robert Burton
has published poems online and in print for over 8 years, and has apeared in Black Box Manifold, issues 15 and 18, the latter a memorial issue for Tom Raworth; ninerrors, otoliths, and the Red Ceilings.

He has worked with Knives Forks and Spoons Press (KFS) to produce poems for an Arts Council funded project in the North West of England. As part of this project his work, along with poetry by nine other poets, was displayed as part of the Blackpool Illuminations from early September until early November 2016.

His first collection Lack Dream was published with KFS in 2017.

Letters from the Underworld ~ Alan Baker
Letters from the Underworld, Alan Baker
September 2018
chapbook [rcp cb56]A6 32pp 50 copies
£6.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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Alan Baker
‘It’s not too late to seek a newer world, is it?’ In a series of twenty epistles, written in the form of prose poems, Alan Baker takes us on a twenty-first century pilgrimage in search of the possibility of spiritual renewal in a world of globalised self-destruction. The poems do not shrink from expressing despair, but they never cease to reach out to us through their beauty and through their consistent plea to all of us to meet one another upon this honestly. As in Dante’s Commedia, many different kinds of language – the political, the spiritual the scientific, the commercial, the playful, the poetic – jostle up against each other in the way that language so often does in life. Like Dante, Baker refuses to isolate the poetic from the living. Yet however fragmented, the poems work together as a compelling whole, thanks to Baker’s measured and masterful use of the prose poem. These letters from the underworld represent the neo-modernist lyric at its best.
Ian Seed
Letters from the Underworld ~ Alan Baker
We Must Betray Our Potential, Scott Thurston
September 2018
chapbook [rcp cb57]A6 52pp 50 copies
£7.00 inc. p&p (UK)
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We Must Betray Our Potential
In these metaphysical dialogues between the dancing and linguistic self, Thurston circles questions of being, ‘self’-presence and identity. The temporality of dance – its fleeting, unrestricted movements – and the apparent ‘solidity’ of the poem as permanence play against each other throughout the book. But the metaphorical nature of language and the material ‘factness’ of the body also weigh heavily – after all, “you can’t edit out your arm.” Thurston’s refusal of a straightforward ‘gesture-as-language’ analogy is admirable. Instead, dance and bodily movement suggest the possibility of gesture as a form of enquiry – an interrogative practice which stands apart from metaphor. In this way the poems clear space for feelings of doubt and vertigo, proposing an ethics of restless, never-settling ‘selves’-examination. How does language, this ‘incorporeal’ stuff, touch us? How are we moved by it? How is thinking made – through movement? Gesture? The trace of a dance?

Amy McCauley